• A lot of founders are really excited at the prospect of building a company, so they take an intellectual shortcut and believe that simply by building, they've achieved fit.
  • The real challenge is to solve a problem.  The company building happens after you figure out how to solve the problem, not before.
  • 98% of the time, "product-market fit" is used incorrectly.  People act like it's a flexible term, and it's not.
  • PMF is what happens after you've built something that people want.  You know you've achieved PMF when people are using what you've built in an explosive and destructive way.
  • If you aren't getting explosive usage, you're not building what customers want - or there just aren't that many customers.
  • The vast majority of founders never find product-market fit.
  • After achieving PMF, it's only going to fail if you fuck it up.
  • You can have users and growth and NOT have product-market fit
  • Is the growth killing you while paying you?  If not, you're not PMF.
  • It's not simply about revenue or growth or retention; it's about every variable available.  How happy are people?
  • It's almost as if there's some predetermined amount of time that you have to wade around in the river of shit that is pre-PMF before you can achieve PMF.
  • You have to be so passionate about solving the problem you're solving that you're comfortable failing at it for a while.
  • It's really hard to build a machine that retains people while growing and spreading.
  • Technical solutions are necessary but not sufficient; you need a market that needs your machine